Kilograms to Pounds2020-11-25T13:34:12+01:00
Pounds
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< == >
Kilograms
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Algebraic Steps / Dimensional Analysis Formula
lb
*
0.453592 kg
1 lb
=
kg

Conversion to common lengths

Grains
Drams
Ounces
Pounds
Stones
Grams
Kilograms
Tons
Kilograms
swap
< == >
Pounds
Input is not valid
Input is not valid
Algebraic Steps / Dimensional Analysis Formula
kg
*
1 lb
0.453592 kg
=
lb

Conversion to common lengths

Grains
Drams
Ounces
Pounds
Stones
Grams
Kilograms
Tons

Converting from “kilograms” to “pounds”

Kilograms to PoundsFormula to convert from “kilograms” to “pounds”:

1 pound (lb) = 0.453592 kilograms (kg)

Currently, the measurement of the weight of metals, especially the weight of precious metals (gold and silver), is mainly measured in pounds.

Suppose you have a certain amount of gold and you know its weight in kilograms, but to be marked by a jeweler, the weight must be converted to pounds.

Old coin with the name LibraAs an example, we can take the idea that we have a quantity of almost pure gold coins, whose total weight is equivalent to 5 kilograms (gold coins are common, especially in coins from Roman times). The formula we studied earlier indicates that each pound (lb) is equal to 0.453592 kilograms (kg). Based on this relationship, we can divide the weight of our gold coins (5 kg) by the weight of a pound expressed in kilograms (0.453592 kg).

The result is equal to 11.0231 Pounds. We can say that our 5 kilograms (kg) of gold coins weigh approximately 11 pounds (lb).

Brief history of the “kilogram”

Over the years, more precise measurements were needed to describe phenomenas about science was studying. At the end of the 18th century, the scientist Antoine-Laurent de Lavoisier had managed to measure the mass of a cubic decimeter of water. This unit had been defined as “Grave” wanting to refer to the word “gravitas” which meant “weight” in Latin. The French Revolution introduced a series of changes in society. The French wanted a series of measurement units that were fair and universal for everyone.

At first, it was decided that the established mass measure would be directly related to nature and not to a criterion defined by monarchies (Lavoisier was a tax collector and was taken to the guillotine for being considered part of the monarchy). The “Grave” remained present in the investigations of republican France, however, it was considered that being a very large unit to measure the masses of common objects, it was necessary to divide it into smaller measurements. Thus was born the “gram“, which consisted of one thousandth of the “Grave”. However, the gram, turned out to be too small to make effective measurements at that time.

Development of the kilogram after years

The prefix “kilo” refers to the number one thousand (“kilogram”: one thousand grams) and this is the reason why the kilogram is the only base unit of the “International System” that has a prefix.

The kilogram (kg) was originally a unit of mass that was equal to the value of the original “Grave“.

In 1799 a more precise measurement was established in which one kilogram was equivalent to the mass contained in a cubic decimeter (dm³) of water, whose temperature was four degrees centigrade (4 ° C), which is the temperature of maximum natural density of the water.

To make the measurement more stable and to be able to be compared with other measurements worldwide, the so-called “Grand Kilo” or “Great K” was created in 1889: a cylinder 39 millimeters (mm) high and another 39 millimeters (mm) in diameter, composed of platinum and iridium that contains the exact weight equivalent to one kilogram.

This artifact is carefully stored in the city of Sevrés, France and was the benchmark for all measurements of the “kilogram” that are used worldwide.

Continuing to maintain such an important measure as the “kilogram” based on a single item (the “Big K“) was considered to be very dangerous in case the item could be stolen. More importantly, the mass of the “Big K” had been determined to have changed since 1889 (One kilogram in 1889 weighed more than one kilogram today).

In fact, the kilogram is such an important unit of measurement in the scientific method, that it helps to define other units of the “International System” as: The mole, the candela, and the Ampere (this in turn is related to other units such as Newtons, Joules, Volts and Watts)

An important piece of information regarding the alteration of the mass of the “Grand K” is that it affects not only the definition of the kilogram. The current definition of the pound is that one pound is equal to 0.453592 kilograms. Therefore, since there is a direct relationship between the kilogram and the pound, it is necessary to have the most accurate and universal measurement of the kilogram.

To take the new measurement of the kilogram, the “Planck constant” was taken as a reference, named in this way after its discoverer, the German mathematician and physicist Max Planck.

Planck’s constant was initially proposed as the constant of proportionality between the energy of a photon and the frequency of its associated electromagnetic wave.

In May 20, 2019, the kilogram is defined as the fixed numerical value of Planck’s constant “h” how 6.62607015 e-34 expressed in kg · m2 · s-1. The present constant will make it possible to define the kilogram through a “power balance” used in the study of quantum physics and not through the “Grand Kilo” which continues to be a reference for the definition of the kilogram although in a secondary way.

Basic units of the “International System” of measurement

The Kilogram is the base unit for measuring the mass of a body in the “International System of Units” (SI, from the French Système international d’unités).

This novel system of units was proclaimed by France and was based on the study of natural phenomena to define its units.

The “International System” of measurement contains the following seven (7) basic units:

  • The ampere (A) used to measure the intensity of electrical current that passes through a body.
  • The kelvin (K), which defines the temperature that a body has with respect to absolute zero (zero kelvin).
  • The second (s) that allows to quantify the time. Currently it is also defined under Planck’s constant.
  • The meter (m) used to measure the length of an object and distances. (It is also governed by Planck’s constant)
  • The candela (cd), designed to measure the intensity of light emitted by a body.
  • The mole (mole) intended to measure the amount of substance contained in a body.

  • The kilogram (kg) used to measure the mass of a body and was defined earlier in this text.

Study of the “kilogram” and its derived units

The kilogram is made up of the units: milligrams (mg), decigrams (dg) and grams (g).

At the commercial level, the most common sub-units of the kilogram are the milligram and the gram.

One kilogram contains one thousand grams (1 kg = 1000 gr). In turn, one gram contains one thousand milligrams (1 gr = 1000 mg). Taking these equivalences into account, we can affirm that one kilogram contains one million milligrams (1 kg = 1.000.000 mg).

The unit of mass, greater than the kilogram most used commercially is the ton. One ton is equal to one thousand kilograms (1 ton = 1000 kg).

Here is a list to make your association easier:

  • The “kilogram” (kg) equals 1000 grams (g) (1 kg = 1000 g)
  • The “hectogram” (hg) equals 100 grams (g) (1 hg = 100 g)
  • The “decagram” (dag) equals 10 grams (g) (1 dag = 10 g)
  • The “decigram” (dg) equals 0.1 grams (g) (1 dg = 0.1 g)
  • The “centigram” (cg) equals 0.01 grams (g) (1 cg = 0.01 g)
  • The “milligram” (mg) equals 0.001 grams (g) (1 mg = 0.001 g)
  • The “Megagram” (Mg) or “Ton” (ton) is equivalent to one million (1.000.000) grams (g) (1 Mg (ton) = 1,000,000 g = 1000 kg)
It is important to note that the ton of the “International System” is differentiated from the ton of the “Imperial System” by adding the term “short” for the United States of America (short ton) and “long” for the United Kingdom (long ton)
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